How the time change affects sleep, health

Daylight saving time ends and clocks will “fall back” an hour this weekend, giving Americans the feeling of an extra hour in the morning, which could negatively affect their health. 

“Ever since the institution of daylight saving time, there has been controversy regarding whether it accomplishes its goals or not, and if so – at what cost,” Timothy Morgenthaler, Mayo Clinic’s co-director of the Center for Sleep Medicine, said in a 2018 interview.

Morgenthaler has reviewed about 100 medical papers related to how the time change could affect health.

Here’s what you should know:

Sleep

Gaining or losing an hour will likely affect sleep patterns, often for about five to seven days, Morgenthaler said. The most notable changes are in those who regularly do not get enough sleep. People who are sleep deprived might struggle with memory, learning, social interactions and overall cognitive performance.

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