Scientists Try To Predict Landslides After Australia Fires : NPR

Charlie Showers, a groundwater geologist, is part of an assessment team that swoops into areas that have recently been burned by bushfires to map out where debris flows are most likely to happen. Red dots represent the highest likelihood of a debris flow event.

Meredith Rizzo/NPR


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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Charlie Showers, a groundwater geologist, is part of an assessment team that swoops into areas that have recently been burned by bushfires to map out where debris flows are most likely to happen. Red dots represent the highest likelihood of a debris flow event.

Meredith Rizzo/NPR

With many of Australia’s hillsides stripped bare by fire, scientists are rushing to predict where mudslides could be triggered by rainfall. NPR science reporter Rebecca Hersher and photographer Meredith Rizzo traveled to Australia to learn how they’re doing it. More of their reporting (with photos) is here.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, edited by Viet Le, and fact-checked by Emily Vaughn.

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