Coronavirus live news: some London tube stations shutdown while Hubei reports no new cases | World news









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A photograph taken with a drone shows the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the empty streets of the capital Athens. Cafes, restaurants, museums and archeological sites in the country have suspended operations until at least 30 March

A photograph taken with a drone shows the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the empty streets around it. Cafes, restaurants, museums and archeological sites in the country have suspended operations until at least 30 March. Photograph: Andreas Tsaknaridis/EPA

Greece’s tourist-dependent economy has been especially hard hit by the crisis. Already the most economically fragile member of the EU after its long-running debt crisis, the country has had mass cancellations of holiday bookings amid fears over coronavirus.

The Greek government, which has ordered all private businesses closed, announced emergency support measures on Wednesday.

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The US government is putting the health and potentially lives of thousands of federal judges, lawyers, court staff and undocumented immigrants and their families at risk by insisting that immigration courts remain open for the deportation hearings of detained immigrants, despite the threat of coronavirus.

On Wednesday, the Department of Justice announced the temporary closure of 10 immigration courts in addition to the already shuttered location in Seattle. All deportation hearings relating to undocumented people who are not in custody have also been suspended.

But a rare alliance of federal employees including immigration judges, Ice prosecutors and lawyers representing immigrants are saying the changes are too little, too late. With 58 immigration courts still open across the country, and only 11 closed, the prospect of courthouses acting as incubators and disseminators of the virus remains pronounced, with the risk of spreading the disease to large numbers of federal employees and the public.

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London is waking up to the news that 40 tube stations will be shut to slow the spread of coronavirus. TfL says it will run a reduced service to enable London’s critical workers to make essential journeys but there will be no Waterloo & City line from Friday, no night tube service and fewer buses.

Some have still expressed concern about how the changes will affect NHS and care workers. Dr Fiona Yung called for parking spaces to be freed up around hospitals.

Fiona Yung
(@DrFYung)

Can #NHS staff jobs be made any harder??!!Come on London see sense and relax some parking restriction around hospitals and for Community & social care providers 😔Coronavirus: 40 London Underground stations to be closed https://t.co/4hJ9Rwp9Cd


March 19, 2020

Julie Combes
(@combes_julie)

Relaxing parking restrictions is going to be key to reducing contact and supporting NHS staff. What can we do? @Lizzie_Smith77 @SadiqKhan @capital_nurse @MRadford_HEECN https://t.co/EkSBp9BKAB


March 19, 2020

DrAngiM GirlySwot
(@WorkPsychol)

This is a disaster! Many workers in #carehomes use the tube to start work at 6:30 am as do #NHS staff

40 London Underground stations to close and Night Tube suspended as capital prepares for lockdown https://t.co/c52YJNGvJW


March 19, 2020

Some felt that the changes made sense as a measure to curb the spread, and given the fact that less people are travelling.

Fashion Worked
(@fashionworked)

Given the expected rise in cases and therefore staff off work a gradual trimming of service makes sense, especially as traveller numbers continue to plummet

Coronavirus: 40 London Underground stations to be closed – BBC News https://t.co/TdDJOAdI2O


March 19, 2020

The move comes amid speculation that London is going into shutdown. Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, said the UK government was about to announce “more stringent measures” for London.

Asked how far the UK was from a “complete lockdown”, Sturgeon said the capital city might see tougher measures first because it was further ahead on the “curve” of the outbreak.

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It is as if the lights have been switched off. The global economy has been plunged into darkness as countries hunker down in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Most recessions develop gradually over time. When the last one started in 2008 it took the Bank of England six months to spot it. This time it is different. Then it was a financial virus, this time it is the real thing. Commentators often say the economy is hitting the wall or is falling off a cliff on the weakest of evidence. Today the cliches are horrifyingly true.

On some estimates the UK economy is on course to shrink by 15% in the second quarter of 2020. That is not a recession, it is a collapse surpassing anything in modern times, including the Great Depression.

When the banks were bailed out in 2008, it was because policymakers feared precisely what is now happening: a complete shutdown of the global economy. The rescue package worked, but only just. The early indications from China are that the impact of Covid-19 is markedly greater than that of the financial crisis, itself the most severe downturn of the postwar era.





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In case you are just joining us:

Dozens of London Underground stations are to be closed indefinitely amid a toughening of measures to try to slow the spread of coronavirus.

An empty escalator in rush hour on the London Underground as the Covid 19 pandemic worsens.

An empty escalator in rush hour on the London Underground as the Covid 19 pandemic worsens. Photograph: RMV/REX/Shutterstock

Transport for London announced a series of changes late on Wednesday evening as it urged people in the capital not to travel if at all possible.

“People should not be travelling, by any means, unless they really, really have to,” said the mayor, Sadiq Khan.

Here is what we know so far:

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